Friday, 10 January 2014

My Gluten Free Bread Recipe!

I have adapted this recipe from my research of many other gluten free bread recipes out there and I still feel I could play around with this one but for now I make this with confidence I will get a great sandwich loaf.
If you have any questions revert to my pages in the blog, everything this recipe is made of comes the information I have gather and written in the blog.
So get your apron on and start baking and eating your own homemade gluten free bread!!!!!


In a bowl thoroughly whisk together:
100 grams Sorghum Flour
100 grams Millet Flour
100 grams Buckwheat Flour
75 grams Tapioca Starch
75 grams Potato Starch
10 grams Ground Flaxseed
1 1/4 tsp Salt
2 tbsp Sugar
2 1/4 tsp or 1 sachet Instant Dried Yeast

In the bowl of your stand mixer with paddle attachment, mix together
20 grams Psyllium Husk
400 grams Tepid Water
4 tsp Vinegar

When the wet mixture thickens to form a gel approx 2-3 minutes, add:
2 tbsp oil

Mix for another minute then add the bowl of dry ingredients and mix for several minutes until well-combined.


Place the dough out into a lightly-oiled bowl, cover the top with oiled plastic wrap touching the surface of the dough. Put the whole bowl in a plastic bag and let rise for 30 minutes - 1 hour in a warm place like on top of your hot water cylinder.


When the dough has risen, turn out onto a lightly-oiled surface and gently deflate by pressing out and roughly shaping the dough into a rectangle shape.


Starting at the short side, tightly roll the dough up, tucking the ends as needed, to form a cylinder. You are trying to create a dense, tight loaf with good surface tension, such that it will hold it’s shape during the final rise and baking.


Tuck the short ends into the loaf and pinch along all the seams to seal.


Finish shaping dough into a loaf by rolling it lightly back and forth (with your hands on top, like using a rolling pin) for a smooth, rounded finished look.


Place the formed dough seam side down in a loaf pan lined with baking paper and cover with oiled plastic wrap to prevent the dough from crusting over. Let it rise in a warm place for 1 hour - 1 1/2 hour, or until the dough no longer springs all the way back when dented with a finger.


Place a tin foil tent cover and open at the ends. Bake the bread in a 210°C oven for 25 minutes, then turn the oven down to 190°C and cook until done, another 20-30 minutes. Remove the tent foil in the last 10 minutes. The loaf is done when tapped on the bottom will sound hollow.



Let your bread cool completely before slicing. Store your bread in a dry cool place wrapped in a plastic bag for several days and it can be kept frozen for up to 6 months. Just pull a couple of slices out the day before if you wish to make sandwiches or toasted straight out of the freezer. Enjoy eating gluten-free bread!

20 comments:

  1. Could I use more sorghum in place of buckwheat?

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    1. You could try. I never have as each flour has it own unique properties that the bread benefits from.

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  2. How much ingredient wise does the loaf cost?

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  3. That would depend of what country you are from. Here in New Zealand I worked it out to be approx $3.80 a loaf. :-)

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  4. What size loaf pan did you use?

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  5. That bread looks great! Nice hole structure. I bet it's delicious!

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    1. Thanks Gina! The next loaf I'm going to bake I'm going to try using more water, higher hydration, to see what the outcome will be.....

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  6. Wonderful!
    I am so glad I 've just found your great blog. A friend of mine told me today the docs said her little girl cannot have gluten anymore. I'm a "bread-aholic" and love to bake at home. I d love to bake a gluten free bread for her, but I 've never baked gluten free before. Could you please suggest a recipe of yours to start with? Maybe if she sees that even living without gluten can be tasty, she 'll be a little bit less "sad". Many thanks.

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    1. I'm sorry for the late reply. I have been away for several months. I would suggest starting with this recipe. Its fairly start forward and once you get the hang of gluten free bread baking it quite adaptable. Good luck!

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  7. how did your higher hydration version turn out? This is a really good recipe, thanks for posting it!

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    1. Sorry for the late reply. I have been away for several months. I am always experimenting and changing my recipe in search for a lighter loaf though each time I still end up with a good loaf of bread. I'm about to try another recipe I have been working on and if successful I shall be posting to share with all!

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  8. Thanks for sharing this information about Gluten Recipes. You did a great job in this post. Keep it up, I will be waiting for your new updates.

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    1. Thank you and your welcome. Working on a few new bread recipes right now and will be trying out over the next few weeks. if successful I will be posting to share with all!

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  9. What would be a good substitute for buckwheat? I have determined I am sensitive to buckwheat. Every time I use it I have the same uncomfortable feeling in my stomach, not with any other NG grain. Amaranth flour? If so how much? Thank you. I love bread, it's what I miss most on a gluten free diet. Your recipes are some of the BEST I have tried and I love the results ( except the buckwheat!)

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    1. Hmmm try replacing equal amounts with Teff Flour. I can't get here in New Zealand otherwise I would be using that. I'm so pleased you have had good results with my recipes. My blog is very informative but once you understand the array world of bread baking and gluten free bread baking things start to make sense and you can work to create a great loaf of GF bread!

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  10. Can you make this in a bread maker

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    1. I'm not sure. I have never used a bread baker for baking GF bread. You could try?........

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  11. Can this be made in a bread maker

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    1. I'm not sure. I have never used a bread baker for baking GF bread. You could try?........

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